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 HANDS ON WORKSHOP:   THE PHASE CONTRAST MICROSCOPY FOR THE CLINICAL PRACTICE OF DENTAL

                                               HYGIENE 

                                               

                                               OZONE THERAPY -  LEARN HOW TO USE OZONE

                                                The benefits of ozone on the body include strengthening the immune system, stimulating

                                                white blood cells, preventing infections and immune system deficiencies by destroying fungi,

                                                bacteria and viruses.

                                                 


LECTURES PROVIDED:      THE PHASE CONTRAST MICROSCOPE IN DENTISTRY, PRESENTED IN DUBAI AT THE

                                               2ND ANNUAL DENTAL-ORAL CONFERENCE     APRIL 2014

                                             

                                               NATURALLY  SPEAKING - WHAT DOES THE CLIENT REALLY HEAR IN THE DENTAL CHAIR,     

                                               PRESENTED IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO TO THE HDDHS SOCIETY    APRIL 2012


                                               UNHEALTHY MOUTH = UNHEALTHY BODY - PRESENTED AT DENTAL SCIENCE &

                                               ADVANCED DENTISTRY CONFERENCE, VANCOUVER JUNE 2018

                                           

​                                               CHILDREN'S DENTAL PROGRAM - SELF-CARE DENTAL APPOINTMENT


                                               PROMOTING THE WORLD'S FIRST DOCUMENTARY OF ORAL SYSTEMIC CONNECTION 

                                               "SAY AHH - A FILM ABOUT  FIGHTING THE WORLD'S LARGEST CAVITY  (THE ONE IN

                                               OUR HEALTHCARE SYSTEM)"


                                                      BIOLOGICAL DENTAL HYGIENE:  WHAT IS IT ALL ABOUT?


HOW TO BECOME A CERTIFIED BIOLOGICAL DENTAL HYGIENIST 


Certification in biological dental hygiene starts with taking our “Biological Dentistry 101” course online or in person and then taking a written exam.

Examination subjects include but are not limited to:

Mercury, mercury toxicity, and mercury-safe dentistry.
Root canals, cavitations, and other oral foci.
Biological approaches to periodontal disease.
Oral manifestations of systemic health problems.
Fluoride.
Therapeutic ozone.

For additional preparation for the exam, we have compiled a recommended library of videos. Click here to view the recommended list.
To complete certification, you must do one of the following:

  • Write an article on using natural approaches in oral treatment and submit it to our education committee for review.
  • Complete a small study and present it to our education committee, in person or via Skype.

Prepare a case presentation that demonstrates how you, as a biological hygienist, think outside the box of the routine hygiene visit. This can be done in PowerPoint and will be reviewed by our education committee.

Maintaining Certification
To maintain certification, you must stay current on your dues, show proof of at least 12 hours CE per year (in biological dentistry or medicine) and attend at least one IABDM conference every 2 years.

Cost
The test fee for certification in biological dental hygiene is $350. There is an additional fee for Biological Dentistry 101: $100 for the online course, $250 for the live version. 


                                          PHASE CONTRAST MICROSCOPE


 First built in 1938 by Fritz Zernike, a Dutch physicist and mathematician. The advantage of the phase contrast microscope

 is to enable the viewing of live microorganisms in their natural state.
 Carol studied the Phase Contrast Microscope from a non-surgical microbiologically modulated antimicrobial periodontal

 therapy, and clinical application of systemic and local antimicrobial agents in periodontal therapy, from Intercept Periodontal

 Strategies, 1994 in New Hampshire, USA with Kyle Messier and with Dr. T. Rams, at the Paul H. Keyes Professor of

 Periodontology in the Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology at Temple University School of Dentistry,

 Philadelphia. With the use of the phase contrast microscope, we can evaluate disease related anaerobic bacteria that is

 able to survive in the oral cavity and throughout our bodies. This creates an Oral Systemic Link to Illness.

 LECTURE SERIES:  1 hour lecture to a 7 hrs. lecture

                                  Hands-On Microscopy Workshop  


 NATURALLY  SPEAKING - WHAT DOES THE CLIENT REALLY HEAR IN THE DENTAL CHAIR?


  PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY:  THE BRANCH OF DENTISTRY THAT DEALS WITH PRESERVATION OF HEALTHY TEETH AND GUMS

  AND THE PREVENTION OF DENTAL CARIES AND ORAL DISEASE.


 Dr. Robert Barkley DDS from Barkley Dental Groups Ltd, Macomb Illinois wrote 

 "DENTAL DISEASE IS PECULIAR.  THE RICH CANNOT BUY IT AND THE POOR CANNOT HAVE IT GIVEN TO THEM. I CAN MAKE

 PEOPLE MORE COMFORTABLE, MORE FUNCTIONAL AND MORE ATTRACTIVE.  BUT I CANNOT MAKE THE HEALTHY.  I CAN TEACH 

 THEM HOW TO BECOME HEALTHY, BUT WHETHER THEY REMAIN THAT WAY WILL BE UP TO THEM"


 We as Dental Hygienists are in uncharted waters in the 21st century.  Eighty years ago most people had lost their teeth

 around the age of 35. Dentists are taught the very basics of caring for the gums and supporting tissues for teeth.  Our role

 as Dental Hygienists in the Oral Systemic Health Care Movement is for Dental Hygienist to become a Periodontal

 Co-Therapist.

 Our goal:  work with our clients to help them become healthier.  


This lecture provides an understanding on how to change the traditional role of a Dental Hygienist to become a

Periodontal Co-Therapist.  Let's help our clients become healthy 365 days a year.


CHILDREN'S DENTAL PROGRAM - SELF-CARE DENTAL APPOINTMENT


 Working with children, helping children to be effective with their own home care encourages independence and a bright

 future. Most children do not like to have things "done to them".  Why not teach them how to be successful with their own 

 home care through "show and tell".  Let children see the bacteria -"sugar bugs" that cause cavities with the use of a Phase

 Contrast Microscope. Once they see the "sugar bugs" they will understand the importance of having "clean teeth". Teach

 them the tools so they can have clean teeth 365 days of the year, not only twice a year.


   SAY AHH - THE WORLD'S FIRST DOCUMENTARY ON ORAL HEALTH TAKES A SOBERING LOOK
   AT THE STATE OF OUR NATIONAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

 Say Ahh presents the story that the answer to our health problems is right under our noses, right inside our mouths. It 

 showcases the unsung heroes of our medical industry: our Dentists and Dental Hygienists. Say AHH looks to serve as

 the connective tissue between dental health and overall physical health. This documentary illustrates how by taking a

 proactive approach to health care we can arrest the decline on our health saving billions of dollars and more importantly

 millions of lives.


TESTIMONIALS

 Leo Vivona   
 Dental Consultant and client
 Carol delivers cutting edge services with immediate results. She has a great thirst for knowledge-a sign of a true professional. 
 October 2013
 

 Dr ArupRatan Choudhury

 Senior Consultant and Professor of Dentistry at Birdem-Bangladesh Institute of Research.
​ Carol is sincere devoted and a brilliant dental hygienist who can render a tremendous service to any set-up, hospital/clinic,
 any teaching or clinical hospital will be fortunate to get her service. 

 June 2014 





INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF BIOLOGICAL DENTISTRY & MEDICINE

IABDM


LOOKING AT THE SCIENCE ABOUT:  

 

WATER FLUORIDATION:  What are the concerns with water fluoridation?


MERCURY RESTORATIONS: How safe are mercury restorations?


OZONE THERAPY:  What is ozone therapy?  How does it work?  Is it safe?


ROOT CANAL TREATMENTS:  What is the science telling us about root canaled teeth?


​Informed Consent Form Regarding Root Canal Therapy and Chronic Apical Periodontitis


Tooth/Teeth #______________ have been diagnosed with chronic apical periodontitis and/or irreversible pulpitis and/or failed root canal therapy where root canal therapy is indicated.
I understand that performing root canal therapy or retreating an existing root canaled tooth is a way to prevent the extraction of a tooth that has become infected chronically or acutely.
I understand that without a root canal, the usual course of treatment of an infected tooth is extraction and that without either treatment there is a risk of more acute and undesirable outcomes such as an abscess.
I understand that teeth with root canals cannot be fully sterilized and several different bacteria and/or pathogens may occupy the space between the filler and the tooth or in other structures of the root.1,2,3,4
I understand that DNA analysis has identified over 90 different pathogens that can exist in teeth with root canals.5
I understand that some of these bacteria may not cause any harm, and some bacteria are known to be very harmful.4,5,6
I understand that individual species of bacteria can transform from harmless to harmful under certain conditions.6
I understand that these bacteria can affect the general health of an individual three different ways.7  

        1)The spreading of live bacteria from the root canal to other structures of the body. 8

        2)Continuous antibody formation resulting in autoimmune reactions. 6

        3)The release of potent toxins that can spread to other parts of the body. 6

I understand that it has been shown that samples of material obtained from teeth with root canal treatment may inhibit enzymes necessary for life.4
I understand that the root canal success rate is 68-85%.9
I understand that conventional 2 dimensional dental x-rays do not always accurately depict the quality of a root canal filling or accurately depict the state of health of the tooth that has had root canal therapy.10
I understand that there is insufficient awareness amongst health practitioners of the potential health problems that can be caused by dental infection including those that may exist in teeth with root canals or untreated dental infection.11
I understand that teeth that have had a root canal do not have to hurt to have the potential to affect general health.4 
I understand there are methods of replacing an extracted tooth.
I understand there are risks related to tooth removal. (i.e. dry socket, loss of function, root fracture)

    ๏    I understand that infections related to teeth are complex and not just made up of bacteria but also fungi and virus’s.13,14 This can result in an ineffectiveness of antibiotics.

    ๏    I understand that over 17% of root canal teeth develop chronic apical periodontitis within a year of treatment.15

    ๏    I understand that there is emerging evidence that root canal therapy and/or chronic apical periodontitis is associated or implicated in the following out comes; increased risk of cardiac disease 16,17,18 brain aneurysms19,20 reduced immunity21,22increased body inflammation,23,24 diabetes25 eye infection26,27,28,29 sinus infection30,31 arthritis32 death33

    ๏    I understand that the inflammation/cancer link is growing stronger in the scientific literature.34

๏    I understand that teeth with root canals are more prone to fracture.35

๏    I understand that root canal therapy decreases the tooth’s immunity by two process’s that we are aware of today.  The first is that because we are removing the tissue known has the pulp that contains the tooth’s vessels and nerves, the tooth loses the defence cells that it once had.  The second is that by removing the pulp, the tooth loses a natural flow of fluid from the core of the tooth to the outside.36  This phenomenon is known as the dentinal fluid transport system and when in place acts as a flushing mechanism to keep bacteria, fungi and virus’s out of the tooth’s structure.  When a root canal is performed, this defence mechanism is lost.

I chose to extract tooth/teeth___________.

I chose to have root canal therapy on tooth/teeth________.

I decline any treatment for tooth/teeth____________.

Print and Sign (patient)_________________________________________________________________

Print and Sign (witness)________________________________________________________________

References for Informed Consent Form Regarding Root Canal Therapy and/or the Treatment of Chronic Apical Periodontitis

1) Nagaoka S, et.al.: Bacterial Invasion into Dentinal Tubules of Human Vital and Nonvital Teeth:

J of Endo 1995, 21(2):70-73

2) Simone SM, et.al.: Supplementing the Antimicrobial Effects of Chemomechanical Debridement with Either Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation or a Final Rinse with Chlorhexidine: A Clinical Study: J of Endo 2012, September

3) Pinheiro ET, et. al.: Capsule Locus Polymorphism among Distinct Lineages of Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Canals of Root-filled Teeth with Periapical Lesions: J of Endo 2011, September

4) Nunnally S: In vitro Enzymatic Inhibition Associated with Asymptomatic Root Canal Treated Teeth: Results from a sample of 25 Extracted Root Fragments: Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine 2012, September

5) Dental DNA laboratory findings http://dentaldna.us/services/dna-fullview-testing/

6) Siqueira JF: Bacterial pathogenesis of apical periodontitis: Braz Dent J (2007) 18(4): 267-280 267

7) Li X, et.al. Systemic Diseases Caused by Oral Infection: Clin Microbial Rev October, 2000: 13(4) 547-558

8) Levine M: Understanding How a Dental Infection May Spread to the Brain: J Can Dent Assoc 2013;79:d9

9) Ng YL, et.al.: Outcome of primary root canal treatment: systematic review of the literature - part 1. Effects of study characteristics on probability of success: Int Endod J. 2007 Dec;40(12):921-39

10) Patel S: The detection of periapical pathosis using digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography - part 2: a 1-year post-treatment follow-up: Int Endod J. 2012 Aug;45(8):711-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2591.2012.02076.x.

11) Glick M: Exploring our role as health care providers: The oral-medical connection: J Am Dent Assoc 2005;136;716-718

12) Pessi T1, Karhunen V, Karjalainen PP, Ylitalo A, Airaksinen JK, Niemi M, Pietila M, Lounatmaa K, Haapaniemi T, Lehtimäki T, Laaksonen R, Karhunen PJ, Mikkelsson J.  Bacterial signatures in thrombus aspirates of patients with myocardial infarction. Circulation. 2013 Mar 19;127(11):1219-28, e1-6. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.001254. Epub 2013 Feb 15.

13) Debelian GJ, Olsen I, Tronstad L. Bacteremia in conjunction with endodontic therapy. Dental Traumatology. 1995 Jun 1;11(3):142-9.

14) Selcuk M. Ozbek,1 Ahmet Ozbek,corresponding author2 and Muhammed S. Yavuz3  Detection of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions by real-time PCR  Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2013 Sep; 18(5): e811–e816.

15) Patel S1, Wilson R, Dawood A, Foschi F, Mannocci F.  The detection of periapical pathosis using digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography - part 2: a 1-year post-treatment follow-up.  Int Endod J. 2012 Aug;45(8):711-23

16) Pessi T, Karhunen V, Karjalainen PP, Ylitalo A, Airaksinen JK, Niemi M, Pietila M, Lounatmaa K, Haapaniemi T, Lehtimäki T, Laaksonen R. Bacterial signatures in thrombus aspirates of patients with myocardial infarction. Circulation. 2013 Feb 15:CIRCULATIONAHA-113.

17) Louhelainen AM, Aho J, Tuomisto S, Aittoniemi J, Vuento R, Karhunen PJ, Pessi T. Oral bacterial DNA findings in pericardial fluid. Journal of oral microbiology. 2014 Jan 1;6(1):25835.

18) Caplan DJ, Pankow JS, Cai J, Offenbacher S, Beck JD. The relationship between self-reported history of endodontic therapy and coronary heart disease in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. The Journal of the American Dental Association. 2009 Aug 31;140(8):1004-12.

19) Pyysalo MJ, Pyysalo LM, Pessi T, Karhunen PJ, Öhman JE. The connection between ruptured cerebral aneurysms and odontogenic bacteria. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. 2013 Nov 1;84(11):1214-8.

20) Pyysalo MJ, Pyysalo LM, Pessi T, Karhunen PJ, Lehtimäki T, Oksala N, Öhman JE. Bacterial DNA findings in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica. 2016 May 18;74(4):315-20.

21) Matsui A, Jin JO, Johnston CD, Yamazaki H, Houri-Haddad Y, Rittling SR. Pathogenic bacterial species associated with endodontic infection evade innate immune control by disabling neutrophils. Infection and immunity. 2014 Oct 1;82(10):4068-79.

22) Debelian GJ, Olsen I, Tronstad L. Bacteremia in conjunction with endodontic therapy. Dental Traumatology. 1995 Jun 1;11(3):142-9.

23) Gomes MS, Blattner TC, Sant'Ana Filho M, Grecca FS, Hugo FN, Fouad AF, Reynolds MA. Can apical periodontitis modify systemic levels of inflammatory markers? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of endodontics. 2013 Oct 31;39(10):1205-17.

24) Maximiliano Schu€nke Gomes, DDS, MS,*† Trevor Charles Blattner, DDS,‡ Manoel Sant’Ana Filho, DDS, PhD,* Fabiana Soares Grecca, DDS, PhD,* Fernando Neves Hugo, DDS, PhD,* Ashraf F. Fouad, BDS, DDS, MS,‡ and Mark A. Reynolds, DDS, PhD§ Can Apical Periodontitis Modify Systemic Levels of Inflammatory Markers? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis  Systemic levels of Inflammatory Markers  volume 39, number 10, October 2013.

25) Sánchez-Domínguez B, López-López J, Jané-Salas E, Castellanos-Cosano L, Velasco-Ortega E, Segura-Egea JJ. Glycated hemoglobin levels and prevalence of apical periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Journal of endodontics. 2015 May 31;41(5):601-6.

26) Koch F, Breil P, Marroquin BB, Gawehn J, Kunkel M. Abscess of the orbit arising 48 h after root canal treatment of a maxillary first molar. International endodontic journal. 2006 Aug 1;39(8):657-64.

27) Ngeow WC. Orbital cellulitis as a sole symptom of odontogenic infection. Singapore medical journal. 1999 Feb;40(2):101-3.

28) Yan W, Chakrabarti R, Choong J, Hardy T. Orbital cellulitis of odontogenic origin. Orbit. 2015 Jul 4;34(4):183-5.

29) Bourlidou E, Kyrgidis A, Venetis G, Panacleriadou T, Mangoudi D. Orbital abscess and inflammation of odontogenic origin. J Pak Med Students. 2012;2(3):92-7.

30) Mehra P, Jeong D. Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin. Curr Infect Dis Rep 2008;10:205-10.

31) Patel NA, and Ferguson BJ. Odontogenic sinusitis: An ancient but under-appreciated cause of maxillary sinusitis. Curr Opin Otolaryn- gol Head Neck Surg 20:24–28, 2012.

32) Breebaart AC, Bijlsma JW, Van Eden W. 16-year remission of rheumatoid arthritis after unusually vigorous treatment of closed dental foci. Clinical and experimental rheumatology. 2002 Jul 1;20(4):555-8.

33) Levine M. Understanding how a dental infection may spread to the brain: case report. J Can Dent Assoc. 2013 Feb 4;79:d9. (http://jcda.ca/article/d9)

34) Marx J  Inflammation and cancer: the link grows stronger: research into a long-suspected association between chronic inflammation and cancer reveals how the immune system may be abetting tumors  Science, vol. 306, no. 5698, 2004, p. 966+. Academic OneFile, Accessed 17 Sept. 2017.

35) Seo DG1, Yi YA, Shin SJ, Park JW. Analysis of factors associated with cracked teeth. J Endod. 2012 Mar;38(3):288-92. doi: 10.1016/j.joen.2011.11.017. Epub 2012 Jan 5.

36) Clyde Roggenkamp Dentinal Fluid Transport: Lifetime Research of Ralph Steinman and John Leonora Leading to a Theory of Hormone-Axis Mediated Dental Cariostasis, Loma Linda University Press of Dentistry, 2004






To learn more about these issues please visit the IABDM at www.iabdm.org  or contact me.